Magnification is how much a telescope enlarges its subject. The mount is computerized, so tracking and locating objects is exceptionally straightforward. Also, you’ll see dark regions on Mar’s surface that contrast to the rest of the surface’s reddish hue. Visible with the naked eye, Mars appears like a star with a reddish tinge in the night sky. Using the 9mm I was able to see an orange disc with no surface detail at all. If you are wanting to see clouds you are going to a need an 8 inch reflector and upwards to 14 inch, which isn’t the most practical. Yes, you’ll see darker patches and possibly a polar cap of Mars from telescope observations given the right atmospheric conditions and the right power in your telescope to view Mars. If you are wanting to see clouds you are going to a need an 8 inch reflector and upwards to 14 inch, which isn’t the most practical. It is about half the size of Earth. You get this based on the focal length of the telescope and that of the eyepiece you’re using. Mars is very bright and surface detail can be difficult to see. If you have a GoTo or an automatic driver for finding night sky objects, simply program the computer to search for Mars and track it as it appears to move across the sky. Looking for a telescope to view Mars with enough power to see its surface features? Be aware that this is the optimal amount and the amount decreases with declining atmospherice conditions. Mars through 8 inch telescope will give you great views but don’t be too disappointed if you have something smaller. I think our window of having good views of Mars has passed (unless you live farther south perhaps) and we’ll have to wait until 2020 to get some better results. As a guide, you can easily work out this maximum useful magnification from the aperture size…. So you don’t need a telescope to see Mars but with a properly configured telescope, you’ll get to see more of Mars than a reddish ‘star’ in the sky. You may be wondering about power (magnification). Necessary cookies are absolutely essential for the website to function properly. These cookies do not store any personal information. You know how Mars is the red planet but what and how can you see beyond a red disk? It’s a good idea to check online schedules for when best to see Mars for your specific location. Its bright reddish hue means even your naked eye will easily discern it from other celestial objects in the night sky. I also have an 8 Dob and Mars doesn't really have any detail from my location. These cookies will be stored in your browser only with your consent. The above is a guide that includes what you are likely to see of Mars through telescope observations based on aperture size. ©2020 telescopenights.com This site participates in the Amazon Associates program. Yes, you can see Mars at night without a telescope. If you considering astrophotography being able to finely track it is essential. Telescope video and images of Mars 8 inch Newtonian [1:31] Mars nearing opposition in May 2016 through my Orion 8 inch 1000mm imaging newtonian telescope. I cover more on this in My Best Telescope For Viewing Planets Buyer’s Guide. Yes, Mars has thin water-ice clouds. Any cookies that may not be particularly necessary for the website to function and is used specifically to collect user personal data via analytics, ads, other embedded contents are termed as non-necessary cookies. Using the 9mm I was able to see an orange disc with no surface detail at all. THIS ARTICLE MAY CONTAIN COMPENSATED LINKS - MY DISCLOSURE. So include a bit of leeway in this case and try for 25x to 30x the aperture size. Through a home telescope Mars will appear as a round reddish object. Can you see saturns rings for instance? Also poor 'seeing' can adversely affect your view. Viewing Mars from an Earth telescope has limitations, but the Hubble telescope gives up much more detail, as seen in the composite photo above, constructed from imagery acquired by Hubble’s WFC3 camera. All of the above is very good advice IMHO.